Today, there are so many school myths that circulate around the school – especially the ones about what it takes to be a successful student. So I’ve decided to debunk a few:

  • It’s good to have a bunch of spares during your senior year:

Although it's really tempting, try to not take a light course load during your senior year. Universities and colleges don’t want you catching “senioritis”! Instead, strive to take courses in English, foreign language, science, math, and social sciences every year. And if you really want to impress the admissions committee, take a challenging course and excel in it!

  • It’s good to join a lot of clubs and do a lot volunteer hours:

Grade nine is the time to surround yourself with new extra-curriculars and exciting volunteer work. As you near grade ten, start piecing out the clubs that are especially important to you, and during your senior years, commit to them.

It is recommended that you commit to ones that…

1) Strengthen and illuminate your leadership skills

2) Help you experience personal and social growth

3) You are interested in

  • You need to join a lot of clubs to look "well-rounded":

Well-rounded people seem to be good at everything. They can play an instrument, do a sport, get good grades, etc. That's why admissions officers like them. But do you know who they like even more??? The answer is... People who are masters of one thing! These people are quite different from well-rounded people, who are seen as "a jack of all trades" and "a master of none". These are people who demonstrate extraordinary achievement in a particular field - which shows that the candidate is able to commit and excel - qualities every university looks for in a potential student.

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